An Apology to Todd Whitworth

Yes, I am an editor here at The Cellar Door.

Yes, I have access to The Cellar Door’s social media accounts, including the Facebook page and the Twitter account. It was I who clicked the bugged links which the author of a recent blog post alludes to— I can only assume that this is one Todd Whitworth, a man who contacted The Cellar Door via Facebook messenger. It was I who responded in sinful anger and derision to those messages. I have a bad habit of referring to people as “sodomites” when I think that they’re defending ideas and/or people which are deeply perverse.

I no longer have any way of contacting Todd Whitworth directly at this point in time, so I’ll just say right here, in the hope that he reads it, that I’m sorry, Todd, for foully insulting you. You were correct in noting that I am not very sanctified, and you were correct in saying that my lashing out at you was hypocritical in light of all that I say I am concerned about, i.e., rank antinomianism, lack of love for God’s Law, Lutherans aping the worldly, etc. I do not merely say that I am concerned about those things— I am very concerned about them. But I am a sinner, and as such I am worse than my principles. Thus I agree that the Law is holy, righteous, and good, and I am not. So please forgive me, Todd, not only for my hypocrisy but also for my sinful words against you. It is much easier to rail against antinomianism “out there” than it is to root out the antinomianism in one’s own heart. I would like to say that I would have eventually apologized for those words on my own, but I don’t know that I would have. It’s good to be found out, for that very reason.

I entertain no delusions about the fact that I have lost credibility because of this private outburst that was made public. All sin has consequences, and that is one of them.

I also imagine that, in the minds of some, this post sidesteps the “main issues” with The Cellar Door blog, namely the anonymity/pseudonymity of its authors and the blog’s putative “breaking of the eighth commandment.” I can’t comment on that. I’m not the sole author of content here at The Cellar Door, and I don’t presume to answer for anyone but myself. Anonymity can certainly be abused (as I recently and regrettably demonstrated), but for reasons which are adequately summarized elsewhere, I don’t think there’s anything inherently wrong with it.

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